Posts Tagged ‘bath remodel consultation’

How Much Does a Bathroom Remodel Really Costs?

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

How Much Does a Bathroom Remodel Really Cost?

Bathrooms are easily the most expensive room per SF to remodel. They average bathroom easily contains as many as 30 to 40 different products all with both material and installation costs. Pricing easily varies around the country but in our area the South West, San Diego to be exact. The Cost versus Value report published each fall in the remodeling magazine shares that for a small average bath in our area costs about $19K. This means some are less and some are even more. I tell clients that 12K to 18K is typical and that $20 to $25K is very possible.

What is the Lowest Possible Price for a Small Bathroom?

About four years ago I did a work up for the lowest possible bathroom cost for a simple 8′ by 5′ bathroom and still have it professional installed it was about 8K then probable would cost about 9K now. Obviously we looked at using very economical priced materials that included: a stamped steel tub, plain white tile tub walls a rod and curtain (no shower door enclosure), low cost chrome plumbing fixtures, a simple 24″ or 30″ oak vanity cabinet, the medicine cabinet was the mirror, vinyl flooring and the $89 box store lowest price toilet special. If it was a flip and sell dwelling then maybe but in someone’s own home by the time they add the things they really want and expect in today’s remodeling world the starting price realistically is $12 to $15K.

If it is a shower stall add at least an additional $1K and a shower door adds even more. Many people want the brushed nickel finishes this add at least $500 to even a $1000 to the price tag. Then maybe you want ceramic tile flooring, cherry cabinets or a medicine cabinet and a mirror and a better quality toilet. Well each of these also adds to the price even further.

Can We Do the Bathroom One Area at a Time?

You can break down the bathroom into three major areas and do them individually if needed. The tub shower area is easily the most expensive portion at about 40 to 50% or $6 to $9K+ of the budget or cost. The vanity alcove or corner including: a cabinet, top, bowl, lavatory faucet, mirror, medicine cabinet and light fixture is about 30 to 40% or $4 to $6K+. The rest of the bathroom: the flooring, toilet, accessories and maybe a vent fan is the about 15 to 20% or about $2 to $3K. This break down yields a $12 to $18K total approximate project cost.

Remember this was a simple small bathroom with a single lavatory bowl and a small 30″ or less vanity. If it has a double lavatory bowl add another $2K to $3K+ for additional cabinets, counter top, lavatory bowl and faucet plus more mirror and a bigger or second light fixture or medicine cabinet.

A larger master bathroom retreat; falls into a completely different category and easily start at about $35K and can be $60K or more. Powder rooms or half bathrooms are not very common but do exist can still be remodeled for about $5 to $7K+.

These are typical numbers found in most US remodeling markets. It has been at least 20 or 25 years ago that we could tell a client that there bathroom would only cost $5 to $7K.

Call us if you have any questions we offer No Cost in home consultations where we can further answer any remodeling questions you may have and discuss a realistic price range for your project.

Contractor Best Practices: Free In-Home Consultation

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

An in-home consultation allows the contractor to discuss your vision with you in depth and to assess your remodeling project with you.

After all, how can a contractor provide you with a realistic price range for your kitchen or bath remodel if they don’t actually visit your home and review the room in question?

A free in-home consultation is a courtesy that any professional remodeling contractor should offer, especially before they provide a preliminary price range for your job. For instance, when assessing the room, a contractor may notice some issues or concerns that may affect the outcome you desire. They may also be able to make suggestions specific to the room that will save you money or give you an alternative design option.

For the first initial appointment as a client, you shouldn’t have to drive to a contractor’s office, wait until they’re ready to see you and then try to describe your remodel vision without being able to show them the room you want to remodel.

K B Design and Remodeling offers free in-home consultations, and I know that most of my peers do as well. If you come across a contractor who refuses to come to your home, you might want to think twice before requesting a price quote from his organization. If he won’t extend you this simple courtesy, where else will he cut corners in customer service?

Contractor Best Practices: Listening

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011

Wrong Scenario: You invite a contractor over for an initial consultation of a kitchen remodel. You can’t wait to tell the contractor your ideas and see how he can help you put it all together into a cohesive remodeling strategy…only you never get the chance. The remodeler takes a look at your kitchen and then starts explaining his ideas for the remodel. He brushes aside your concerns as he points out all the changes he would make to your kitchen. It all sounds good, except for one problem – it’s no longer your remodel!

Right Scenario: The contractor arrives at your home and immediately asks you all about your ideas. He listens carefully, speaking only to ask for clarification. He nods often and engages in good eye contact. After you finish describing your ideas, he asks considerate follow up questions that make you think in new directions. Only after you have fully described your vision does he review your kitchen. After a thorough look, you sit back down, and the contractor explains concerns, issues and ideas he has based on what you’ve told him. All of his suggestions are helpful and practical. You feel like he truly understands your vision and is dedicated to getting it right.

A good contractor can bring plenty of great remodeling ideas to the table, but first and foremost he must bring his ears and use them.

I consider listening to be the number one best practice for a contractor. Every client has a vision for their home, and it is the contractor’s duty to understand and share this vision. Of course, in most cases, the vision needs a little clarification and fine tuning, and that’s where the contractor can really shine.

Great outcomes start by listening to the client and delivering their vision.

What to Expect During an Initial Contractor Consultation

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Requesting an initial consultation with a contractor is a big step toward starting your remodeling project. The consultation is a chance for you to clarify your vision of the project, get answers to your questions, and receive initial feedback on the viability of your ideas. Depending on how far along you are in the planning process, the contractor may also be able to provide you with an approximate forecast or price range  for your project and a possible timeline for what you want done.

Many people, especially those who are considering their first remodel, don’t know what to expect from the initial consultation. Below, I walk you through the process and provide tips on how to get the most out of your consultation. Please be aware that this information is based on how we at K B Design and Remodeling perform our consultations. Other firms may operate in a different manner, though most of the fundamentals should be the same.

Firstly, the initial consultation should take place at your home so that the contractor can have direct access to the potential remodel area.

Secondly, the first part of the consultation should include a lot of listening on the part of the contractor. This is your project, and the contractor needs to know your story and your ideas before offering any suggestions.

Once you have described your vision, the contractor will use their experience and expertise to provide potential remodeling solutions, which may include design suggestions, cost saving tips, and remodeling strategies.  Ask lots of questions, especially if you don’t understand something the contractor is saying.

A contractor will also tell you about their company and past projects. They may share a portfolio of pictures of other projects that were similar to yours. They should also provide an explanation of how their team works on a project and what you, the client, can expect during the actual remodel.

Always ask lots of questions during the initial consultation! Many folks are just curious with what is possible and what certain ideas would cost. In some cases, the contractor can forecast a potential cost range for your project for preliminary planning purposes. Just be aware that until the exact specifications are confirmed, no contractor can accurately provide a final project cost sufficient for honest evaluation for comparison bidding purposes.

Cost estimates may vary widely between contractors and may not be the best way to choose a contractor. That’s why another important function of the initial consultation is for the client and contractor to get to know each other. Determine if the contractor was knowledgeable, if you connected with one another, if the contractor seemed to understand your vision and if you liked their suggestions. Remember, you will be spending a lot of time with your contractor throughout the remodel process, so it really helps to go with someone you respect.

After the initial consultation, take some time to digest the information you learned. If you are serious about your project, it is probably in your best interest to bring in several contractors to bid on the project (learn about our contractor proposal review guarantee).

It is also a good idea to bring back your top contracting choices for a second meeting, especially if some time has lapsed since the initial consultation. The second meeting is usually more thorough, and provides you and the contractor an opportunity to fine-tune your vision. On the second meeting, K B Design and Remodeling will often use a category cost worksheet to develop a more accurate forecast of a project’s realistic price range.

That basically summarizes the purpose of an initial consultation. Read the tips below to get the most out of your meeting.

Maximize Your Initial Consultation:

  • Free up at least two hours of time for the meeting and try to limit any possible distractions.
  • Make sure all the major decision makers are present at the meeting.
  • Provide the contractor with as much detail as possible for what you envision for the project. You don’t need to have every last faucet figured out. The contractor can help you fill in the blanks
  • Come to the meeting with an open mind. The contractor may offer advice or alternative solutions based on their extensive experience in the remodeling industry.
  • Come to the meeting with a general budget in mind. This will help the contractor suggest solutions within your price range.
  • Ask lots of questions. This is your house and your money on the line. Make sure you are completely comfortable with the entire process before moving forward.
  • Assess the contractor. The initial consultation isn’t just about getting details and suggestions for your project. It’s also an opportunity to test out the personality and working style of the contractor. Make sure to look carefully at their portfolio to determine if their style and results are what you want for your home.
  • Make certain that you contact two or three of the references that a contractor offers you. This will often give you more confidence in your choice.

If you think that you are ready for an initial design consultation for your remodeling project, we would be happy to listen to your goals and provide you with our knowledge and recommendations. Call (619) 448-2927 or E-mail us at Frank@KBDR.net